A free-spirited weekend

We spent our Sunday of Memorial Day weekend at the annual Boulder Creek Fest. We’ve gone to the fest just about every year that we’ve lived here, with the exception of a couple. I love it for the beauty, the food, the music, the people, the atmosphere, and just the general vibe of the whole thing.

As we were there with the kiddos this year – Ava walking or riding on daddy’s shoulders and Julian riding in the Ergo on me – I couldn’t help but think how fortunate we are to live here and raise our kids in Colorado. Although we don’t live in Boulder and may never be able to afford to, I love visiting it. I love the free-spiritedness (if that’s a word), the liberal attitude, the open-mindedness, the green movement and hippie mentality.

We stopped to listen to two bands play – Kutandara (African marimba music) and Wendy Woo (folksy rock) – and I felt drawn into the music. I had no qualms about dancing in front of the stage with my kids, along with a slew of other people. Ava found her groove and danced up a storm, literally dancing circles around an older girl at one point. 🙂 And Julian patted my chest while I danced to the beat of Kutandara and later, after growing suitably tired from an afternoon at the festival, fell asleep in the Ergo while i swayed to Wendy Woo who, only three weeks postpartum, was belting out song after song. It felt good to be out there dancing in my newly purchased $4.99 hippie skirt with my son strapped to my chest, my daughter playing in the dirt and my husband nearby, without a care in the world. I wish my life was like that more often.

Anyway, it was while we were all out there grooving to the music that I felt so thankful that my life’s path has taken me to this part of the country – where I feel free to be me (most of the time). And where I feel I’ve really grown into my skin and am becoming the person I want to be. *happy sigh* It was a wonderful day.

Welcome to my new home

Welcome to my new home over here at crunchydomesticgoddess.com. I’m hoping I didn’t lose anyone in the move from my old residence at WordPress.

I’m glad to have my own domain (finally) and the freedom to do more things with my blog. To repeat the words of little orphan Annie, “I think I’m gonna like it here.” (Big thanks to Jody for helping me with the move.)

Please be sure to update your links and bookmarks to my new home, sweet home. http://crunchydomesticgoddess.com

If you are scratching your head wondering what in the world that picture is in my header. It’s granola, of course! Granola, crunchy – get it? I thought it was fitting. Anyway, I’ll probably change it to something else once I get sick of looking at it. Edited to add: It’s been three days and I already grew sick of the granola header, so I’ve changed it to something else – a little meez.com pic of moi. 🙂

Hope everyone has a nice weekend. It’s going to be sunny and warm here. Perfect weather for the Boulder Creek Festival, which we plan to attend.

An evening with Ina May

Ina MayAs I set out driving Friday night to hear Ina May Gaskin – called “the mother of authentic midwifery” by Midwifery Today – speak, I was filled with nervous excitement. When I was about 10 minutes out from the church in Lafayette where the event was taking place, a friend of mine called me to say she was saving some seats for me and other friends of ours and she was able to get pretty close to the front. I felt like a teenager going to a rock concert. Third row seats! We got third row seats to see Ina May! 🙂

As I pulled into the parking lot, I saw moms with their children in baby slings or carriers, groups of women without children, as well as some couples all making their way towards the entrance. I pulled in a spot, got Julian from the backseat and into the Ergo carrier when I overheard a woman a few cars down from me say, “I’m so glad I remembered to bring my book for her to sign.” D’oh! I never even thought to bring my copy of “Ina May’s Guide to Childbirth.” Some groupie I am, eh?

With only five minutes to spare before the talk was supposed to begin, Julian and I hightailed it into the building, quickly saying hello as we passed a couple of women I know from our AP group on the way. I couldn’t wait to get inside.

We made our way to the front of the registration line and we were greeted by my midwife K with a big hug. I wanted to stay and chat with her, but there wasn’t time and she had a lot more participants to check in, so we agreed to try to meet up after Ina May’s talk to chat. My excitement and anticipation grew.

Once inside the church, I spotted my friends waving me down in, yes, the third(!) row, right in front of the podium. I may have skipped a little as I made my way towards them and settled down in my seat with Julian.

We chatted for a good 10 to 15 minutes before Karen Robinson, the president of the Colorado Midwives Association (CMA), came out to welcome everyone to the event, speak a bit about the CMA, and then, the moment we were all waiting for, introduce Ina May Gaskin.

The applause began immediately and Ina May walked in to a standing ovation.

She began her talk with a bit of history both about herself and about the history of birth and obstetrics in the United States. While I have read and heard before about how women used to be treated in hospitals (drugged to the point of being unconscious while their babies were extracted from their bodies using forceps, etc.), it gives me the heebie-jeebies every time. She told us how her first birth was in a hospital, where, despite her belief that she could’ve given birth naturally and without pain medication, she was drugged and her baby was taken out using forceps.

She spoke about the path that lead her to become a midwife, as she began attending births while traveling across the country (on hippie buses) with hundreds of others who were following Stephen Gaskin on a five-month-long speaking tour across the United States. 11 babies were born on the buses during the Caravan. She has attended more than 1200 births to date.

She talked about Sphincter Law which is described in detail in her book “Ina May’s Guide to Childbirth.”

“The Sphincter Law recognizes the cervix as a sphincter along with the other excretory sphincters. These sphincters function best, Gaskin points out, in an atmosphere of privacy and familiarity.” —Midwifery: the Revival an Old Profession

So it is difficult for a woman to give birth in a hospital with nurses and doctors shouting “PUSH!” or making threats of “you’d better get that baby out soon or you’ll have a c-section” etc. Just as it would not be easy for any of us to shit (yes, she said shit! and ass too for that matter) on command. If you are sitting on the toilet, trying to take a crap and someone walks in on you – what happens? You stop crapping until you feel safe and no longer vulnerable. Same thing can also happen with birthing a baby.

She also talked about the mind/body connection, though I don’t know if she used that term. She described how she has witnessed a woman get stuck at 7 cm (or whatever) for hours on end with no apparent physical reason, only to later discover that this women’s mother died in childbirth, so this woman was afraid she would die too. Once the “secret” was out, however, the woman was able to dilate to completion and have her baby. She ran into something similar in another situation as well. But (and this is my own rambling here) had something like that happened in a hospital, how many doctors would stop to wonder what could be causing this woman’s labor to stall or would they threaten the woman that if she didn’t dilate by such and such time, she would need a c-section? Yes, I believe things need to change in the obstetrical world.

She talked a little bit about Ricki Lake’s new movie, “The Business of Being Born,” as she is interviewed in it. She mentioned that it received a standing ovation at the Tribeca Film Festival and that Ricki had recently been interviewed about it on “The View.” Someone asked how can we see the film and she recommended we start calling our local movie theaters to ask them when they will be getting it. Let them know there’s a demand for it.

At the end of her talk, she took questions from the audience. Questions were asked about VBACs (vaginal birth after cesarean), breastfeeding, circumcision, vaccinations and breech births. I don’t recall all that was said since we were going on two hours of Julian being a happy camper in my lap and he was starting to get squirmy.

I know she said that she believes breastfeeding should continue as long as it’s mutually satisfying to both the child AND the mother. If mom isn’t enjoying the breastfeeding relationship anymore, she doesn’t believe in continuing to nurse out of guilt. She is currently in the process of writing a book about breastfeeding.

She doesn’t believe in routine circumcision, but has seen many circumcised boys in her years as a midwife, and even acted as a mohel for a while.

I didn’t get to hear a lot of what she said about vaccinations, since it was about that time that I decided Julian and I needed to move from our third(!) row seat and stand in the back, where I could sway with him and keep him contented. I recall her saying that she felt some vaccinations were OK, but she believes in starting them later than the recommended age. And that there were others (like chicken pox) that she wouldn’t recommend.

After I had Julian tucked back into the Ergo and we were swaying at the back of the room, someone asked a question about her thoughts on breech births (i.e. should they be automatic c-sections?). This, as some of you who have read Page 1 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 7